First image: unedited and uncropped
Second image: crop, exposure, contrast, sharpness and temprature edited in VSCO Cam
Third image: white areas of image edited in Facetune
Fourth image: sharpness and temperature edited in VSCO Cam.
Over the past year I have become a big fan of Instagram. I have always casually enjoyed photography but never considered myself very skilled, and was always insanely jealous of the aesthetic masterpiece that was my sister's feed. In February last year I started to link all of my blog posts to my Instagram and joined the #BloggingGals #fbloggers community. I love Instagram for finding new blogs and love the community of bloggers out there who always leave lovely comments on each other's images. More recently I have started to gain a bit of attention from friends about my feed and the way I edit my photos and so I thought I would share with you the complicated looking but actually not that complicated process of taking my pictures from the images you can see on the left to the ones on the right.

I use two apps to edit my photos, VSCO Cam and Face Tune. I know that Afterlight is another extremely popular app for editing, but it has only recently launched on Android after previously being an iPhone exclusive and I don't have enough space on my phone to download it so I am unable to use it. I firstly upload my photos, which are taken on a mixture of my phone camera and my DSLR, and upload them into VSCO Cam. If taking photos on my DSLR then I email the photos from my computer onto my phone so that I can use them in the app. VSCO Cam is a free app with purchasable add-ons, but the desktop version is very expensive so it is much cheaper to use the app on your mobile or tablet device. When I edit an image on VSCO Cam the first thing I tend to do is skip the filters and head to the editing settings. I don't hate filters and think they're an easy way of having a cohesive feed but I prefer my images to look as natural as possible and I just like making sure my pictures are bright and light and sharp as opposed to looking overly edited. My first stop in editing is to crop the image to a square and rotate it to how I l like, and then I head to exposure. VSCO Cam's settings all increase in intensity on a scale of 1 to 12 or -6 to +6. Exposure lightens an image and is great at making it brighter, especially images that have a lot of white in them which mine tend to do. I hate the look of white appearing grey in images and always make sure to edit this. I increase the exposure from anywhere between +2 and +4 depending on how bright it is to start, and then increase the contrast by +1 or +2 to add some colour back into any darker areas such as black that can look slightly grainy when the exposure is high. I also like to bump up the sharpness, especially if it is a DSLR photo and will go up to +6 to keep it looking really crisp, or +3/+4 if using an image from my phone that is lower quality as I don't want it to seem pixelated. Finally, I decrease the temperature usually to -1 as I think it makes the white appear brighter in images. Altering the temperature of your images is a great way to get them looking more cohesive.

Next, I export the image and upload it into Facetune. There has been a lot of hype about Facetune being the app that the Kardashians' use to edit their infamous selfies, but I find the editing tools used for selfies really helpful for other images. Mostly I only use Facetune for the whitening setting which is meant to be used to whiten teeth but I find perfect for any white backgrounds such as my desk or my bed sheets. Again, this really lightens and lifts any white colours from looking grey. The only other feature I use this app for is retouching on the rare occasions it is needed. This is useful if you notice after you've taken a photo that, for instance, you have a scuff on the sole of your shoe or a lipstick swatch on the back of your hand in the photo (both of these things have happened to me!). It is super easy to make your retouching look as natural as possible by either patching up the chosen area or blurring it and making the imperfection look less defined. Once this is done I export the image again and upload it back into VSCO Cam. Unfortunately Facetune is an app that you have to pay for but I believe it only costs a few pounds and there are not many other purchasable add-ons so once you pay you have access to almost all of the app. 

Back in VSCO Cam I make some tiny final tweaks to perfect my image. Sometimes exporting the image a few times can lower the quality a little so I like to bump up the sharpness again, and also the whitening tool can sometimes make the image look warmer while it lightens it and so I can adjust the temperature again if needs be. Once it is done I make sure to compare it to the other images in my VSCO Cam gallery before uploading to Instagram. 

And that is how I edit my Instagram photos! I really hope you found this talk-through useful - I realise to some this may sound excessive but all in all it takes me about five minutes to do, and doing roughly the same to each image makes sure they all look similar even if the subject matter or colour palette is varied. I love this effect on my images and love using Instagram to share them. Make sure to follow me on instagram @maddyscribbles and leave your own usernames in the comments below so I can check them out!

make sure to follow this blog on bloglovin'   
twitter    /    facebook   /    instagram
First image: unedited and uncropped
Second image: crop, exposure, contrast, sharpness and temprature edited in VSCO Cam
Third image: white areas of image edited in Facetune
Fourth image: sharpness and temperature edited in VSCO Cam.
Over the past year I have become a big fan of Instagram. I have always casually enjoyed photography but never considered myself very skilled, and was always insanely jealous of the aesthetic masterpiece that was my sister's feed. In February last year I started to link all of my blog posts to my Instagram and joined the #BloggingGals #fbloggers community. I love Instagram for finding new blogs and love the community of bloggers out there who always leave lovely comments on each other's images. More recently I have started to gain a bit of attention from friends about my feed and the way I edit my photos and so I thought I would share with you the complicated looking but actually not that complicated process of taking my pictures from the images you can see on the left to the ones on the right.

I use two apps to edit my photos, VSCO Cam and Face Tune. I know that Afterlight is another extremely popular app for editing, but it has only recently launched on Android after previously being an iPhone exclusive and I don't have enough space on my phone to download it so I am unable to use it. I firstly upload my photos, which are taken on a mixture of my phone camera and my DSLR, and upload them into VSCO Cam. If taking photos on my DSLR then I email the photos from my computer onto my phone so that I can use them in the app. VSCO Cam is a free app with purchasable add-ons, but the desktop version is very expensive so it is much cheaper to use the app on your mobile or tablet device. When I edit an image on VSCO Cam the first thing I tend to do is skip the filters and head to the editing settings. I don't hate filters and think they're an easy way of having a cohesive feed but I prefer my images to look as natural as possible and I just like making sure my pictures are bright and light and sharp as opposed to looking overly edited. My first stop in editing is to crop the image to a square and rotate it to how I l like, and then I head to exposure. VSCO Cam's settings all increase in intensity on a scale of 1 to 12 or -6 to +6. Exposure lightens an image and is great at making it brighter, especially images that have a lot of white in them which mine tend to do. I hate the look of white appearing grey in images and always make sure to edit this. I increase the exposure from anywhere between +2 and +4 depending on how bright it is to start, and then increase the contrast by +1 or +2 to add some colour back into any darker areas such as black that can look slightly grainy when the exposure is high. I also like to bump up the sharpness, especially if it is a DSLR photo and will go up to +6 to keep it looking really crisp, or +3/+4 if using an image from my phone that is lower quality as I don't want it to seem pixelated. Finally, I decrease the temperature usually to -1 as I think it makes the white appear brighter in images. Altering the temperature of your images is a great way to get them looking more cohesive.

Next, I export the image and upload it into Facetune. There has been a lot of hype about Facetune being the app that the Kardashians' use to edit their infamous selfies, but I find the editing tools used for selfies really helpful for other images. Mostly I only use Facetune for the whitening setting which is meant to be used to whiten teeth but I find perfect for any white backgrounds such as my desk or my bed sheets. Again, this really lightens and lifts any white colours from looking grey. The only other feature I use this app for is retouching on the rare occasions it is needed. This is useful if you notice after you've taken a photo that, for instance, you have a scuff on the sole of your shoe or a lipstick swatch on the back of your hand in the photo (both of these things have happened to me!). It is super easy to make your retouching look as natural as possible by either patching up the chosen area or blurring it and making the imperfection look less defined. Once this is done I export the image again and upload it back into VSCO Cam. Unfortunately Facetune is an app that you have to pay for but I believe it only costs a few pounds and there are not many other purchasable add-ons so once you pay you have access to almost all of the app. 

Back in VSCO Cam I make some tiny final tweaks to perfect my image. Sometimes exporting the image a few times can lower the quality a little so I like to bump up the sharpness again, and also the whitening tool can sometimes make the image look warmer while it lightens it and so I can adjust the temperature again if needs be. Once it is done I make sure to compare it to the other images in my VSCO Cam gallery before uploading to Instagram. 

And that is how I edit my Instagram photos! I really hope you found this talk-through useful - I realise to some this may sound excessive but all in all it takes me about five minutes to do, and doing roughly the same to each image makes sure they all look similar even if the subject matter or colour palette is varied. I love this effect on my images and love using Instagram to share them. Make sure to follow me on instagram @maddyscribbles and leave your own usernames in the comments below so I can check them out!

make sure to follow this blog on bloglovin'   
twitter    /    facebook   /    instagram

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