Looking into my wardrobe at an unorganised mess and feeling significantly disheartened is an all too familiar feeling for many of us and more than ever I have to admit being guilty of this recently. It's the same emotions that make us exclaim "But I have nothing to wear!" while staring at a stuffed closet of clothes. Moving out of my childhood home is as good an excuse as any to have a total wardrobe clear-out, helped by the fact that when I move to university I will be taking a seven hour train journey along with my mom and will only be able to transport items that are absolute necessities - aka only the clothes I actually wear. All over Instagram and Pinterest we are flooded with images of free standing rails adorned in harmonious matching pieces and colour palettes. I have yearned after having my own capsule wardrobe for years, and after purchasing my own clothes rail from IKEA a few years ago I have been fabricating the illusion of one as I display my favourite key pieces from Zara or Topshop with pride in my bedroom, while behind my mirrored wardrobe doors a very different story was being told. 

But enough is enough. I have decided to take a stand against my hoarding ways and saying "NO" to pointless sale buys, while the back of my mind shouts insistently that in fact if a top costs only £4 in the sale then it doesn't even count as buying more clothes, right? But dressing like the Instagram girls of my dreams doesn't have to mean sticking to a boring uniform to various shades of beige and grey along with the classic monochrome, it's more about purchasing classic pieces that will last through various seasons and trends which ensures better value for money as well as a more pulled-together look (in theory). Having recently started doing this myself I have devised a simple three-step process to feeling much happier with your wardrobe, which for many can lead to feeling much happier with yourself all together. 

The first thing to do is to remove EVERYTHING out from within its organised (or unorganised) home - dressers, drawers, wardrobes. This is the only way assess what stays and what goes, a mental tour of your wardrobe is not enough. Once you've done this you must also try everything on - clothes that do not fit from three summers ago simply have to go, as do anything that you bought for a special occasion and will most likely never be worn again. This can be gruelling, but sentimental items will only be an obstacle in achieving optimum wardrobe potential. Step two is crucial - you must actually throw out the items in your throw out pile. Whether you donate them to a charity shop, dispose of them in clothes recycling bins, giving to friends or sell them on Depop, putting clothes in a box at the back of your loft does not help your storage, and will live in the back of your mind as an uncompleted task. Finally, you must look at what's left and where the gaps are. This can be done by taking photos on your phone of each item or writing a list of everything that's left, but by doing this it means that every subsequent item bought can be a more thoughtful purchase. While recognising the gaps in your wardrobe doesn't necessarily mean a £200 Asos purchase is in order (though that will also not be discouraged) it can allow you whenever you're browsing to know what you need, and not just what you want. Over time this can lead to a much better functioning wardrobe. Move over, Instagram girls.

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Looking into my wardrobe at an unorganised mess and feeling significantly disheartened is an all too familiar feeling for many of us and more than ever I have to admit being guilty of this recently. It's the same emotions that make us exclaim "But I have nothing to wear!" while staring at a stuffed closet of clothes. Moving out of my childhood home is as good an excuse as any to have a total wardrobe clear-out, helped by the fact that when I move to university I will be taking a seven hour train journey along with my mom and will only be able to transport items that are absolute necessities - aka only the clothes I actually wear. All over Instagram and Pinterest we are flooded with images of free standing rails adorned in harmonious matching pieces and colour palettes. I have yearned after having my own capsule wardrobe for years, and after purchasing my own clothes rail from IKEA a few years ago I have been fabricating the illusion of one as I display my favourite key pieces from Zara or Topshop with pride in my bedroom, while behind my mirrored wardrobe doors a very different story was being told. 

But enough is enough. I have decided to take a stand against my hoarding ways and saying "NO" to pointless sale buys, while the back of my mind shouts insistently that in fact if a top costs only £4 in the sale then it doesn't even count as buying more clothes, right? But dressing like the Instagram girls of my dreams doesn't have to mean sticking to a boring uniform to various shades of beige and grey along with the classic monochrome, it's more about purchasing classic pieces that will last through various seasons and trends which ensures better value for money as well as a more pulled-together look (in theory). Having recently started doing this myself I have devised a simple three-step process to feeling much happier with your wardrobe, which for many can lead to feeling much happier with yourself all together. 

The first thing to do is to remove EVERYTHING out from within its organised (or unorganised) home - dressers, drawers, wardrobes. This is the only way assess what stays and what goes, a mental tour of your wardrobe is not enough. Once you've done this you must also try everything on - clothes that do not fit from three summers ago simply have to go, as do anything that you bought for a special occasion and will most likely never be worn again. This can be gruelling, but sentimental items will only be an obstacle in achieving optimum wardrobe potential. Step two is crucial - you must actually throw out the items in your throw out pile. Whether you donate them to a charity shop, dispose of them in clothes recycling bins, giving to friends or sell them on Depop, putting clothes in a box at the back of your loft does not help your storage, and will live in the back of your mind as an uncompleted task. Finally, you must look at what's left and where the gaps are. This can be done by taking photos on your phone of each item or writing a list of everything that's left, but by doing this it means that every subsequent item bought can be a more thoughtful purchase. While recognising the gaps in your wardrobe doesn't necessarily mean a £200 Asos purchase is in order (though that will also not be discouraged) it can allow you whenever you're browsing to know what you need, and not just what you want. Over time this can lead to a much better functioning wardrobe. Move over, Instagram girls.

make sure to follow this blog on bloglovin'   
twitter    /    facebook   /    instagram

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